Full reopening of Stanley Park’s sea wall to the public


The Vancouver Parks and Recreation Association has announced that the final section of the Stanley Park Seafront, between Third Beach and the Lions Gate Bridge, has reopened.

According to Dave Hatch, the park’s director of planning and development, “It’s not like any other storm we’ve ever seen. “How important they use it.”

The Vancouver Parks and Entertainment Association is pleased to announce that the final section of the Stanley Park Seafront, between Third Beach and the Lions Gate Bridge, has reopened.

The 3.5-kilometer sea wall was closed to the public on January 7 after suffering extensive tidal damage, strong winds, large amounts of debris in the water and an unprecedented storm that day.
Damages caused in the special route

Dave Hatch, the park’s director of planning and development, added: “Since then, efforts have been made quickly and tirelessly to reopen the wall so that residents and visitors can use the special route during the warmer months.”

Safety was also an important consideration during this process, as we were not dealing with a typical construction site here. Access to all points was sometimes difficult and the weather played an important role in this regard. In addition, precise timing had to be done, especially in areas with higher tides.
Sea wall repair

To reopen the seawall in the spring, it was decided to repair the damaged areas on site and add reinforcements wherever possible. The process involved using lock blocks to build retaining walls in areas where the sea wall had collapsed, to prevent further erosion and damage.

The walls were reinforced with new stone and concrete, and the damaged sections were rebuilt with asphalt to ensure that the entire seawall route was prepared for user use.

Note that since this sea wall is always exposed to severe weather conditions and also due to the continuation of partial repair and reconstruction operations in some areas of the wall that do not affect the route, visitors should be on the move when moving on this Be careful.
Continuation of repairs in areas with more severe damage

Although this part of the Stanley Park seafront has been reopened, repairs to the Kitsilano pool, Jericho pier and other areas affected by the storm will continue.

Climate change is causing hurricanes like the ones in November 2021 and January 2022 to be more frequent and intense in the region. These drastic climate changes should be considered a “warning” about future climate change that will lead to rising sea levels and shoreline changes. The Vancouver Park Association plans to discuss with residents of the province how to plan to address the issue and how to make coastal parks, seafronts and beaches more resilient to climate change.

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